Dendritic Cell-based Vaccine (DC)

Current Situation

A vaccine is a preparation which actively immunizes the treated person against specific pathogens, such as surface proteins on measles or influenza viruses. Dendritic cells (DC) present a broad range of antigens and are responsible for the induction and orchestration of all antigen-specific immune responses. DCs can be generated from white blood cells and loaded with antigen, resulting in a DC-based vaccine which is tailor-made for each individual patient. Inducing an immune response against tumor antigens, especially tumor stem cell antigens like ABCB5, is the key to a permanent cure due to the body’s own immune system being able to identify and remove all malignant cells. Various DC vaccines have been investigated as potential curative therapies for cancer with some promising results being shown.

 

Objective

To produce a DC vaccine for the treatment of ABCB5-expressing tumors.

 

Procedure

An optimized protocol for generation of dendritic cells from fresh or frozen cells is currently being scaled up for use in clinical trials.

The safety profile and biological activity of the DC vaccine will be investigated in disease models.

 

Partner

 

« back

News
Clinical Trials

We are now also recruiting patients for further clinical studies in phase I/IIa with allogeneic ABCB5-positive (ABCB5+) mesenchymal stem cells for the following indications: chronic venous ulcer (CVU), diabetic foot ulcer (DFU) and peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD). For more information click HERE.

License

Besides the authorization to manufacture a human medicinal product in accordance with § 13 (1) of the German Medicinal Products Act (AMG) for autologous mesenchymal stem cells, TICEBA is also authorized to manufacture a medicinal product for allogeneic mesenchymal as well as allogeneic limbal ABCB5 + stem cells following a recent extension. For more information click HERE.

The Story of Stem Cells

Review our category "The Story of Stem Cells" with the newest topic "Stem cells in wound healing" HERE.

Newsletter